Local News

83 cases of COVID-19 identified within the Greater Hunter

LATEST_COVID_BANNER_3_650x431.jpg

A further 83 cases of COVID-19 were diagnosed within the Greater Hunter over the past 24-hours. 

It brings the total number in the current outbreak to 2,811 - with 1,010 active cases. 

The Hunter New England Health District recorded 24 in Newcastle, 20 in Cessnock, 11 in Port Stephens, seven in Lake Macquarie, six in Maitland and Tamworth, five in the Mid-Coast, three in Dungog and one in Armidale. 

There are no new cases identified within the Upper Hunter regions.

23 of the total active cases are currently being cared for in hospital and five are in ICU. 

47 were infectious while out in the community, 30 were isolating during their infectious period and six remain under investigation by health experts. 

Meanwhile, New South Wales recorded 304 locally acquired cases overnight.

A breakdown of today's figures:

24 are from Newcastle LGA

- 7 from Carrington

- 6 from Mayfield

- 4 from Wallsend

- 3 from Mayfield East

- 1 from Adamstown Heights

- 1 from Black Hill

- 1 from Merewether

- 1 from Waratah

20 are from Cessnock LGA

- 12 from Kurri Kurri

- 5 Cessnock

- 2 Weston

- 1 Bellbird Heights

11 are from Port Stephens LGA

- 10 from Raymond Terrace

- 1 Nelson Bay

7 are from Lake Macquarie LGA

- 1 from Cardiff South

- 1 from Charlestown

- 1 from Jewells

- 1 from Macquarie Hills

- 1 from Morisset

- 1 from Toronto

- 1 from Windale

6 are from Maitland LGA

- 2 from Rutherford

- 1 from Ashtonfield

- 1 from Morpeth

- 1 from Windella

- 1 from Woodberry

6 are from Tamworth LGA

- 4 from Tamworth

- 1 from South Tamworth

- 1 from West Tamworth

5 are from Mid-Coast LGA

- 4 from Taree

- 1 from Forster

3 are from Dungog LGA

- 3 from Martins Creek

1 is from Armidale LGA

- 1 from Armidale

To see vaccination rates by postcode visit https://bit.ly/Vaccination_by_postcode.

To view the case location map for NSW visit https://bit.ly/NSW_CaseLocations.

Image: Grant Broadcasters

Tags: coronavirus, covid-19